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Educate Yourself About Publishing

How do I choose a publisher?

Despite all the trials and tribulations of last year, and the start of this one, there are some of you who took that time apart from everyone else to get beavering away; writing the manuscript that could eventually turn into the book you always dreamt of creating. If this is you, then listen up! because we will be spending this coming year giving you all the information that you need to know to get from where you are, to where you want to be book-wise at any rate! Throughout this year I will be guiding you through the basics that you need to know to before you even start to think about publishing. From the differences between Traditional, Self and Vanity publishing, the types of editors and why you need (at least)one! how to research your book cover so you get it right first time. How to use social media as an author and what to avoid, the benefits of having a mailing or contact list, what to include if you are thinking of having a website (note: you can get great FREE sites). How to go about getting your book into bricks and mortar shops, ideal readers, what and who they are. and in the last part of the year we’ll look at launching, interviews and marketing.

Don’t try to run before you can walk, writing and the process of getting your book ‘out there’ is a marathon, not a sprint. Rushing leads to sometimes very costly mistakes.

This month we are looking at the different publishing options, I hope to give you enough so you can start  thinking about what will be the right route to market for you, and the career you want to have.

Let’s start by talking about Traditional publishing, this is what a lot of people think of when they talk about publishing. Traditional publishing is when a publishing house buys your manuscript and turns it into a book for sale. They have the rights to make changes within the story, to choose the cover, the internal design, the price and the marketing strategy. Sadly, just because you have a traditional publisher does not mean that you will have a whole team dedicated to doing all your marketing for you. The main thing with this route is that you must be able to cope with multiple rejections before you get offered a deal, and this could take years, or might never happen.

Self-publishing, also called independent publishing lets you decide just about everything, when your book is ready, who you want to publish with, your cover and internal design, even the price. Your royalties can be significantly more, but that’s because it is a lot more work! companies often ask for thousands of pounds to publish your book. My rule has been, and will always be, do not pay to publish! You will be responsible for your own cover design and blurb, the ISBN numbers. One of the great and terrifying points to self publishing is that you won’t get rejected! That means you can produce a rubbish book, not bother with an editor, or the cover design, and put it out there for free. But you also won’t get anyone recommending it, and that means very, very poor sales. Which defeats the object really. As an indie author you maintain intellectual rights over your work, and your royalties can be significantly more ranging from between 10% and 70% for eBooks from book one. Most independent publishing houses pay royalties on a monthly basis into your bank or paypal account. So, what’s the downside of choosing to independent publish? it’s hard work, and the average self-published author sells 250 books a year (and only 1000 in a books entire lifetime) and earns £800 a year.

Don’t ever respond to pop-up advertisements, or publishers who approach you, not on social media, not even by email – reputable companies don’t work that way.  Learn more about Route to Market here 

I’m so looking forward to being a part of your author journey!

TTFN. Eden

 

 

 

 

 

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